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Was that a random walk or was he pushed? And what was that vocalization? I tried to take notes and couldn't.
Ref says no foul, he just walked in himself, phone in hand.
Love the bit at the end when he's dragged out and lets himself hang like a dead seal or something.

When I live in the same place for a few months (or more) and begin to figure out a routine and acquire the basics I need to live there, etc., I start to go crazy. I find myself obsessing about trivialities such as matching towels, or stocking up on supplies.

Maybe other people consider this the good life (getting nice stuff and so on), but I always regard it as a sign that I've been there too long and it's time to move on.

Any other INTPs relate? Any theories re our function stack?
Yes, opposing forces Si-Ne. Ne likes to discover and change, Si digs for all the details - but coming in third in our stack, Si naturally throws it back at Ne after we feel this thing here is saturated.
 

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When I live in the same place for a few months (or more) and begin to figure out a routine and acquire the basics I need to live there, etc., I start to go crazy. I find myself obsessing about trivialities such as matching towels, or stocking up on supplies.

Maybe other people consider this the good life (getting nice stuff and so on), but I always regard it as a sign that I've been there too long and it's time to move on.

Any other INTPs relate? Any theories re our function stack?
I’ve been here for two months and all I’ve been doing is stocking on pizza related supplies because I have to make my own favorite food. This lousy state lacks quality pizza.

I also ordered 20lbs is spaghetti on amazon. I suppose what happens when you give me a place to live and the ability to get food, I will get food that I’ve been eating since I was born with little variation.

Well, the ramen I’ve never really eaten before. But I see it’s value and why broke college students depend upon it around the world.
 

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I suppose I’m justifying my merchandise purchases by watching the Mandalorian now. How weird though to be watching One Season of a show with only 8 episodes after watching 30 seasons of a show with 21-23 episodes each season.

I finished the Simpsons, watched all episodes on Disney+, the movie, played road rage and hit & run even the 4m Maggie shorts on there.

There is nothing else in the franchise for me to do. There is the Simpsons game and Tapped Out! But I would have to restart Tapped Out for unknown reasons. I had progress when I first played the games years ago when it came out, but when I download the app now I start from the beginning.

I would say for what it’s worth, despite being constantly called “irrelevant” these days, it’s still funny. The newest episodes weren’t bad, they still had some wit. It’s just very different from the original seasons that made it popular. Even though people hate on it and say it has been running too long, it isn’t quite at the level of HD Spongebob which is totally flat and painful to watch.
 

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I did a huge trek yesterday. 25 miles (or 41km, for those who are not metrically ambidextrous) in the Yorkshire Dales, right in the most northwesterly edge of the national park. I learned an interesting thing. The Yorkshire Dales was fairly recently extended to take in more land, allowing for a "national park land bridge" connecting the Yorkshire Dales and the nearby Lake District, another national park in the neighbouring county of Cumbria to the west, so now you can cross seamlessly between the to parks and remain within official national park territory. The interesting thing is that the extension of the Yorkshire Dales has put part of the national park into Cumbria, so yesterday's trek was in Cumbria, even though it's known as the Yorkshire Dales.

Anyway it was excellent. It was one of the most difficult treks I've ever done, it covered 5 of the highest points in Yorkshire, plus a couple of other slightly smaller peaks. For the last couple of peaks I was almost in a state of delirium during the ascents. Tiredness was causing my eyes to feel droopy and unfocused. We than had about 2 hours more of walking back to where we'd parked, which was frankly horrible after the prior 8 hours of trekking and peak ascension we had just endured. There were barely any marked paths (aside from the OS map showing a dotted line where a path should exist); we were yomping across uneven grassy and boggy terrain for much of it. It was extremely demanding, but, as is the case with most forms of exercise, you always feel good when it's done. And now I feel good. Physically battered worse than I've been for years, but good.

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This is Wild Boar Fell, the final and most difficult part of the trek. Another interesting thing, relating back to my previous point about how the Yorkshire Dales now overlaps into Cumbria, is that the term 'Fell' to denote a peak is a very Cumbrian thing. The Lake District has 133 peaks with the word 'Fell' in the name, whereas the Yorkshire Dales only has 24.
 

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Also, random thought #2:

My dad was messaging me via SMS last night. Quite odd because he has Facebook Messenger and we normally use that. I think he was drunk or being eccentric. He's an ENTJ, a type not necessarily known for supreme eccentricity, but they have their quirks.

Anyway, I noticed that his messages are exactly the same as my INTJ work mate. Completely emotionless and fact-based, with just a 'lol' at one point. It's funny because my dad is a sociable, 'characterful' guy in real life who gets on well with everyone, yet his way of messaging is completely robotic. I almost pity NTJs in this regard: they're terrible at appearing human in text conversation.
 

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Also, random thought #2:

My dad was messaging me via SMS last night. Quite odd because he has Facebook Messenger and we normally use that. I think he was drunk or being eccentric. He's an ENTJ, a type not necessarily known for supreme eccentricity, but they have their quirks.

Anyway, I noticed that his messages are exactly the same as my INTJ work mate. Completely emotionless and fact-based, with just a 'lol' at one point. It's funny because my dad is a sociable, 'characterful' guy in real life who gets on well with everyone, yet his way of messaging is completely robotic. I almost pity NTJs in this regard: they're terrible at appearing human in text conversation.
Hah, my dad's e-mails to me are the most cruel thing, like some kind of evil alter ego of his. Very imposing and unvarnished. (Also ENTJ, which is why I'm saying this.)
 
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I was browsing when I got a little window referencing about 25 interesting PerC posts mostly from my subscribed threads. I wanted to view some but when I clicked the window disappeared. How do I get it back and where did it come from?
 

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Re email/online alter egos: I'm calm and mostly unemotional in person. I used to use lots of exclamation marks in my emails and posts. A few people commented on my exuberance, and now I limit myself to one exclamation mark per.
 

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Re email/online alter egos: I'm calm and mostly unemotional in person. I used to use lots of exclamation marks in my emails and posts. A few people commented on my exuberance, and now I limit myself to one exclamation mark per.
Amazing! I once belonged to a bulletin board where I just wanted to observe and comment and be recognized as an unbiased persona. I absolutely refused to use exclamation points as they would show the bias I didn't want to be labelled with. (Others were profuse in using them.)

Speaking of punctuation, the colon I typed was hard to see. So every time a colon was needed I posted "::" and did it quite often. No one ever commented on the joke until one guy (who was far and away cool funny) imitated me*. I finally felt justified, satisfied. If thanks were a feature I would have thanked him but never said anything.

* "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery."
 

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According to this, the N types ought to be more hunter gatherers in personality. The other interesting part is on the face shapes.

I find the laziness around physical work to be interesting. It seems there are contrasting personalities around that revolve around this aspect. I found difficulty getting along with my brother and mother because they were always pushing toward getting something done physically, changing something.

I’m what one might call a low-energy individual. I have no problem laying around doing nothing for significant amounts of time.

 

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Very interesting. I have a round/square face, but I'm a hunter gatherer for sure!
 

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I think I might be doing that impulsive INTP thing where lots of "good ideas" flood in all at once.

I've just learned that a mate of mine has got a job in London; he's moving there soon. With that fact, I'm now considering finding a job in London too. It's pretty much the exact opposite of my prior plan to find remote work and live somewhere remote in Scotland, but my reasoning is that I might end up rather lonely if I do that now. It's not like I'd see that friend every day (in fact I bet we would see each other far less than desired - such is London life), but it would be nice in a way to get back into a vibrant city environment where I can flourish a bit and start getting to know people again. When I returned here from China I just wanted to escape humanity entirely and reset; I've done that now, so perhaps I can dip my toes into one of Europe's megacities for one last blast. Surely it would be better than all the bullshit I had to deal with in a China megacity.

It would probably be better from a career standpoint too. But I just don't know about the other things, daily life etc. "Grass greener; Other side"

Okay, update while writing this post: I applied for a London job and now a recruiter has just called me up (quick response!). He said, "Are you aware it's in London? You don't live in London. We actually have a remote role that might be better for you."

So maybe I can get that remote role after all, and still move to London if I so wish...! Or anywhere really. Cool!
 

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Okay, update while writing this post: I applied for a London job and now a recruiter has just called me up (quick response!). He said, "Are you aware it's in London? You don't live in London. We actually have a remote role that might be better for you."
Wow, what's on your CV?
 
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Found a copy of Dr. Strangelove Or How I Learned to Love The Bomb, the book.

It's a fantastic read, aside from one major disappointment during the quarrel scene.
It never says: "Gentlemen. You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!"


My favorite line from the movie. I wonder if Peter Sellers perhaps came up with it himself on set (but then again, apparently the original novel was rewritten after the film, and that's the edition I'm reading now so I don't see why it should be omitted, shocking).
 

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Wow, what's on your CV?
Programmer stuff :D

It feels weird being so 'wanted' in the employment world, specially after being so skint for so long. I had to set my job hunt status back to 'hidden' on the jobs website I was using because I was suddenly inundated with recruiters trying to contact me.

Apparently this 'popularity' short lived though - it's said that programmers end up on the heap quite quickly after they pass 45 years old.
 

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It's unusual not to 'wear the pants', so to speak, intellectually.
So when the opportunity comes: ASK AWAY - listen to what the other person (smarter, or equally smart) has to say.
 
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