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Discussion Starter #1
Just wanted to know about the life of ISFJ software developers considering that this industry are best for the NTs.

Basically, I want to know:
  • What is your job role/level (i.e. team lead role, manager)?
  • What platform/language or what is your specialization?
  • How do you catch up with the demands in the industry?
  • What do you do after work (or do you still have time and life after work)?
  • What ticks you off (i.e. stressful situation) and how do you cope with that?
  • Are you happy with your career?
 

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1.) What is your job role/level (i.e. team lead role, manager)?
Uh.... I guess I would describe it as just a general developer. The progression where I work goes Associate Developer, Developer II, Developer III, Architect, with Lead->Supervisor being offshoots of that.

I'm a Developer II, and I'm pretty heavily invested in mentorship of newer people, but I'm not in any way a "lead" or "supervisor."

2.) What platform/language or what is your specialization?
It's a proprietary programming language based on Smalltalk. It's used for EDI Development.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Data_Interchange

3.) How do you catch up with the demands in the industry?
Well, since I'm kind of in a weird niche, the "demands in the industry" aren't that much of a concern for me in my current position. I code with an old language that the company is trying to get rid of. I did recently take a Java Certification course so I guess that's me trying to keep my skillset up.

4.) What do you do after work (or do you still have time and life after work)?
I have no life outside of work. It's something I'm working on. There are a number of reasons for this. Probably the biggest one is my own apathy and lack of motivation to find something better to do.

5.) What ticks you off (i.e. stressful situation) and how do you cope with that?
Not that much really. I guess I get angry when I feel helpless to make things better in a situation. It's not really something I experience at work.

6.) Are you happy with your career?
Well, truth is that I've lowered my standards considerably and thus am happier than I was at first. I grew up a lot at this job. I got it pretty much right out of college and had a pretty bad time for a while. I really wanted to quit but forced myself to stick with it and tried to quiet the bad feelings I had about the whole thing. Basically, my fear of quitting my job and being unable to find another kept me in check long enough to find my place, lower my standards, grow up a little. Now, I feel at least reasonably positive about it. I've gotten a lot of positive feedback from other people and I've repeatedly been shown that I'm at least of above average competence on my team and in the department.

So... I guess... I'm happy enough at the moment, but I know that I could probably find something better, but I'm not motivated enough to do that.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
@PilesofJuicyMeat Wow. We almost share the same view.

Well, since I'm kind of in a weird niche, the "demands in the industry" aren't that much of a concern for me in my current position. I code with an old language that the company is trying to get rid of. I did recently take a Java Certification course so I guess that's me trying to keep my skillset up.
Congratulations for passing the Java certification. :) I've been planning to take the exam since the last three years (back then, it's Java 6; now it's Java 8). I already had a certification preparation course for that but worry got the best of me which also led me to procrastinate. I tried the mock exam and heck, it's so tricky. That made me think I'm not yet ready to take the exam. At the same time, I didn't have much time before since I had so much workload and I only focused on Android development (plus some team lead roles which made me focused on familiarizing myself with agile methodology). At times, I think certification is not necessary but until now, I still can't get it out of my head. Right now, I'm still torn between taking it or not. I'm focusing on my deliverables (quality) and the process itself (getting rid of impediments, ensuring communication between teams and clients).

I have no life outside of work. It's something I'm working on. There are a number of reasons for this. Probably the biggest one is my own apathy and lack of motivation to find something better to do.
Ditto. Not sure if this applies to all ISFJs but I suppose this is related to us having hesitations on trying something new unless someone introduces and convinces us that the latter is better. I focused on one programming language because I fear I might be missing some essential concepts and opportunity of mastering the platform. As for life outside work, I have a lot of things that I wish I knew/try but I get overwhelmed or anxious when I'm working on it -- unless it is shared with a friend. Recently, this game called Terraria was introduced to me and I got addicted to it. I would really invite you to play this if I know you personally. :)

Not that much really. I guess I get angry when I feel helpless to make things better in a situation. It's not really something I experience at work.
Usually when there's a problem that occurs (e.g. bug or failed to meet the deadline), I feel frustrated. Often times, I think it's because I'm incompetent or there was something wrong in the process. I'm trying to work that out but just thinking that when such thing happens, it's for learning experience.

Basically, my fear of quitting my job and being unable to find another kept me in check long enough to find my place, lower my standards, grow up a little. Now, I feel at least reasonably positive about it. I've gotten a lot of positive feedback from other people and I've repeatedly been shown that I'm at least of above average competence on my team and in the department.
That's why I'm learning new language/s right now. It helps to learn the basic concepts (e.g. lifecycle, concurrency, OOP, etc) so I would only focus on the syntax. I yearn for having a professional mentor. I need some validation to the concepts I share with my 'mentees'.
 

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Basically, I want to know:

What is your job role/level (i.e. team lead role, manager)?
-Front-End Web Developer

What platform/language or what is your specialization?
-Angularjs/SCSS/jQuery

How do you catch up with the demands in the industry?
-Keep up-to-date with award-winning websites, find something cool they did and figure out how to do it myself

What do you do after work (or do you still have time and life after work)?
-Competative eSports takes up most of my weekday time, but weekends often have coding-splurges (This last weekend was a 6-hour delve into d3js)

What ticks you off (i.e. stressful situation) and how do you cope with that?
-When I'm not given all the content (ie. copy) for a project and have to rework it from the start because the design no longer meets the needs of the project

Are you happy with your career?
I like it for now, but I really can't see myself doing this for the rest of my life. I'd like to work as a manager over a development team or work in consulting in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i cant do computer stuff to save my life. I remember going to a webpage design class in grade 11. i nearly died
LOL don't worry. "Almost dying" is part of the learning process which happens to me often because I took this as my career. I'm happy for you. xD

Meh, it's been months. I actually wrote this because I was struggling to learn a new language. Can't force myself to learn it when it doesn't feel like it's required. :unsure:
 

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I'm interested in why y'all decided to choose Software Development as a career.

It seems like it would be rather difficult based on how our functions are. I got the impression that it would more of a creative type's choice.
 

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I'm interested in why y'all decided to choose Software Development as a career.

It seems like it would be rather difficult based on how our functions are. I got the impression that it would more of a creative type's choice.
It seems like it would be more creative than it actually is. One thing to consider about software development is that you are trying to solve some problem by creating your software. That means there are requirements to take into account, so you always have this fairly firm structure that you are working off of. Programming in general is something that appeals to introverts. Its use of math plays towards our leaning towards sensing.

Really, the feeling is pretty much the only thing that doesn't really help too much with programming. I notice for me in manifests itself in inconsistent code at times. When people are reviewing my code I'll sometimes get a: "Why did you do it this way?"

I have to respond "I don't know, but it works."
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I guess the only that keeps me from choosing this career is that I'm longing for that satisfaction to provide a solution that's convenient and intuitive. What bothers me is the intricacies. There's only so much details I could work with. Beyond that, it's cumbersome. There's this challenge in 'translating' functionalities into a software product. I guess I get bummed because I'm not exposed with a lot of concepts.

I kinda feel sorry for myself for saying this. :sad:
 

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I guess the only that keeps me from choosing this career is that I'm longing for that satisfaction to provide a solution that's convenient and intuitive. What bothers me is the intricacies. There's only so much details I could work with. Beyond that, it's cumbersome. There's this challenge in 'translating' functionalities into a software product. I guess I get bummed because I'm not exposed with a lot of concepts.

I kinda feel sorry for myself for saying this. :sad:
Aren't you having fun anymore with software development?
 

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Until I figure out a way to deal with these self-defeating thoughts, no.
Right now I am going to school for IT.
I sometimes face these self-defeating thoughts too. Especially when I'm practicing some Java on HackerRank, some people's codes are much more convenient or shorter.

I am majoring in it for Grad school to enter psychology, though. :unsure:
 

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What is your job role/level (i.e. team lead role, manager)?

Front-end web developer

What platform/language or what is your specialization?

C# ASP.NET, JavaScript, HTML, CSS

How do you catch up with the demands in the industry?

I don't, as I don't feel motivated. I have a lot of other things going on in my life and I like to stick to what I know. This is something I need to get better at though, or I need to switch jobs.

What do you do after work (or do you still have time and life after work)?

Bowling (once a week), Pool (once every 2 weeks), Gym (once a week), Dancing (once every 2 weeks), Board Games (once every 2 weeks). I'm not in a relationship and still live at home with my parents.

What ticks you off (i.e. stressful situation) and how do you cope with that?

Being asked to work out project timescales. I find this really difficult, especially when you're in a meeting and you're asked to give an answer straight away! I normally base my timescales on past experiences with building something similar (which are normally correct). However my boss doesn't like this and asks me to break it down bit by bit, but my brain can't always think of 'all' the possibilities until I start programming it! I haven't found a way to cope with this yet, but it does cause anxiety/low mood/stress.

Things are constantly changing, which isn't great as I generally remember something once I have done it a few times. Therefore, deploying code can always be a bit stressful, as you've got to make sure you've put everything in the right place. Once automated deployments are setup though, this should be less of a problem.

I don't always like being criticized on my code, as I feel like I've done a good job but then my boss might say otherwise. He's quite harsh about it as well, which means I sometimes avoid him, which obviously isn't very healthy and is something I need to get better at.

Are you happy with your career?

Yes and no. I enjoy it when coding the front end visual stuff, but not the more logical stuff. I like to be left alone to code, but when I have meetings, etc., this I find boring or stressful. And working out the project timescales isn't fun. I've accepted that I'm not the best fit for the job, but I'm trying to work out if I should be more engaged or go and find something else.

I don't really use my 'caring' side of my personality a lot, so I'm thinking that I either need to change jobs, or start volunteering in my spare time to feel fulfilled. I would also like a relationship, which could be an alternative to bring out my caring side, but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon, as I struggle dating due to anxiety.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How do you catch up with the demands in the industry?

I don't, as I don't feel motivated. I have a lot of other things going on in my life and I like to stick to what I know. This is something I need to get better at though, or I need to switch jobs.

...

What ticks you off (i.e. stressful situation) and how do you cope with that?

Being asked to work out project timescales. I find this really difficult, especially when you're in a meeting and you're asked to give an answer straight away! I normally base my timescales on past experiences with building something similar (which are normally correct). However my boss doesn't like this and asks me to break it down bit by bit, but my brain can't always think of 'all' the possibilities until I start programming it! I haven't found a way to cope with this yet, but it does cause anxiety/low mood/stress.

Things are constantly changing, which isn't great as I generally remember something once I have done it a few times. Therefore, deploying code can always be a bit stressful, as you've got to make sure you've put everything in the right place. Once automated deployments are setup though, this should be less of a problem.

Are you happy with your career?

Yes and no. I enjoy it when coding the front end visual stuff, but not the more logical stuff. I like to be left alone to code, but when I have meetings, etc., this I find boring or stressful.

...

I don't really use my 'caring' side of my personality a lot, so I'm thinking that I either need to change jobs, or start volunteering in my spare time to feel fulfilled. I would also like a relationship, which could be an alternative to bring out my caring side, but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon, as I struggle dating due to anxiety.
I really feel you, @LifeIsStrange. A lot. I am currently in the same position as you were. How have you been?

It's been years since my last visit here in PersonalityCafe. I'm still in the same career and feel like changing careers. At times, I slowly challenge my inner demons by learning/studying the tools needed for work. I don't know if it's giving me false sense of fulfillment. I guess I haven't found my next career.

It does affect my dating aspect too, thinking that I am not passionate or living my life to the fullest. I still have that dedication to work but it feels...misplaced. :sad:
 

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Things are better

Thanks for your message. Well I can tell you now that a lot has changed for me since I wrote that last post. I had a mental breakdown not long after I wrote this post (in January 2019). I was very anxious, not wanting to eat, drive, etc. That led me to make changes. I started seeing a life coach who offered me alternative ways of thinking, as well as giving me the push to change careers. A new journey!

I discovered that I wanted to help others (typically what ISFJs do) and therefore quit my old job as a software developer. I now work as a support worker for adults with learning disabilities, taking them out into the community to support their independence. I absolutely love the job and everyone there (staff and the learners) seem to compliment me on my performance. It may not pay as much, but I am happier, which matters far more than money. :jazz:

My support worker job is part time whilst I am studying at college. In the UK, you can do "Access To Higher Education" courses in healthcare, which then enable you to go to university. I have done really well on the course so far and am proud of what I've achieved. Although it's been cancelled due to the coronavirus, I will be able to go to university in September to study Occupational Therapy, which will hopefully interlink with my current job considerably. A big life change awaits me!

Since making these changes, I am a lot happier, confident and have made more close friends with similar interests. People respect me for who I am and I am able to attract the right sort of people into my life now, just by being myself. It's really amazing what can happen when you just be yourself in an environment that works for you rather than trying to do something you have no passion for.

At the end of the day, everything comes down to your well-being. If you're not happy, make changes, as you've only got one life on this planet! This may be hard for ISFJs to do, but honestly, when you say "fuck it" and follow your intuition, you feel so much better.

Some of the things that I have learnt, whether from the life coach or others, include:
  • Watch the documentary Heal (2017). It will change your perception of everything, including stress etc. Lets be honest, I was under chronic stress for 7 years whilst I was working as a software developer.
  • As well as being an ISFJ, I am a very strong highly sensitive person (HSP). I have learnt about my strengths and weaknesses as a HSP, and working with those qualities rather than against them (acceptance), I am a lot happier and have been able to impact other people in positive ways. I am currently reading the "Highly Sensitive Man" by Tom Falkenstein.
  • You only get one life, so live it! You may not wake up again tomorrow. Take positive risks and do what you were meant to do. This doesn't necessary mean being the life of the party, as ISFJs aren't like this, but don't take life too seriously and do what you want to do.
  • Believe in yourself more. People find the kindness of ISFJs attractive and respect them. Your purpose is to help others, so that is what you should do. What you worry about does not matter in the grand scheme of things.
Sorry, for the essay, that's enough about me! Sorry to hear it @_haphazard, but as I mentioned above, no one is stuck in a situation forever, and if you're not happy, you should make changes to your life. I don't think you'll ever be fulfilled as a software developer if you're an ISFJ. Start afresh, looking at all of your options on careers you could pursue. Caring for others will probably be a good choice, so perhaps try doing some work experience for a care company and give it a go. I recon if you enjoy it and therefore decide to do it full time, you will enjoy it a lot more and go a lot further with your life :jazz:

Yes, when you're not passionate and not in love with yourself, you cannot possibly love someone else. I still am single, but am pretty confident I could get a girlfriend now if I wanted to, which is different to my previous attitude. Women seem to be a lot more attracted to me now than when I was in my depressed/grumpy mood whilst working in software development! It will naturally fall into place when you're in a more loving and happy mood :jazz:.

I'm happy to give further advice to anyone who is struggling. This is what I am most passionate about :heart:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hey @LifeIsStrange, I'm so happy for you!!! I'd be so happy to hear more from you and I may have to read your response a couple of times 'til it lights a fire under my butt. Oh man, if you're only a block away, I'd invite you over coffee but definitely that's not possible right now (especially I'm not in the UK).

Reading this now I realize my resistance of changing courses -- money. I'd say I'm secure in this job because work goes on in spite of this pandemic. Working for a few years and living frugally, my take home pay is better than my previous years. Currently, I'm considering other careers like data analytics, blockchain, or project management but nothing seem convincing. It feels empty no matter how successful I overcome/resolve these tasks. "Go big or go home" as they say but I don't feel fulfilled in the end.

I guess I am still overwhelmed right after reading this. There's a lot of things going in my mind right now, which could mean I need to consider another option outside IT. Thanks @LifeIsStrange, it may have saved my life from spiraling down.

Off-topic: Please tell me that you got your handle/username @LifeIsStrange) from that game. If so... oh gawd, dude... I-- :sad:
 

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Sorry, I went a little deep on that last post and I wasn't entirely clear! @_haphazard I wrote too much. I guess the main message I was trying to get across is that you need to take a holistic approach to your happiness and well-being. It may be hard to "kill the past" and start afresh, particularly for ISFJs, but it is worth it in my opinion, rather than just having a feeling of being "stuck". When you take a holistic approach, everything else will fall into place, such as confidence, relationships, friends, etc. :jazz:

That's why I mentioned the Heal documentary, as it explains this stuff a bit more. How your mental health, environment, stress levels can affect your physical health. I'm very much interested in spirituality and ways of having good health and well-being, watching a lot of YouTube videos from various people like Joe Dispenza, Bruce Lipton, etc. So that's what I was trying to talk about, and may have confused you writing about it!

Do you enjoy working as a Software Developer? If you do, then fair enough, stay in the job. But if you don't enjoy it, try something else. It wasn't right for me and I didn't fit in. Although you may think "this is secure and pays well", that shouldn't be the reason to stay. I recently found a quote that summaries it well:
Working hard for something we don’t care about is called stress; working hard for something we love is called passion.
Obviously stress isn't good and will lead to bad mental health, bad physical health, lack of fulfillment, etc. But when you're doing something you are passionate for, you will naturally attract better health, relationships, fulfillment, etc. Everything falls into place when you've taken a holistic approach to your happiness (as you'll hear about if you watch that documentary or see other sources of spirituality). This is known as the Law of Attraction.

Yes it is a lot to take in. It's taken me a long time to get to the stage I'm at in terms of knowing things on spirituality. At the end of the day, follow your intuition on what you want to do, rather than what is just the safe option or what others expect from you. You'll feel so much better and your health will benefit from it. :jazz:

Yes I did get my username from the game Life Is Strange. I guess at the time I thought it was a good way of explaining how I felt! I no longer play video games as I don't get time, but I will admit Life Is Strange is one of the better ones I've played! :smug:
 

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I'm not an ISFJ, but in my previous job, I worked with someone who was probably an SiFe or maybe NiFe type/Socionics xEI who had a similar job to me. I'm an internal developer for my department (I posted more details here if you're curious).

From my perspective, he was very smart and picked things up quickly. If faced with a new situation, he wasn't the first to come up with a solution but was quick to work on solutions once proposed by others (usually me or our other teammate, who was probably a TiNe type/Socionics LII). I noticed he was not really comfortable setting a direction but made valuable contributions to the shared decision making process. He always seemed to be kinda "chilled out" - very easy going/relaxed. All three of us were basically allergic to stress and would make sure we never had too much pressure, lol. The guy was honestly great to work with, I'd definitely work with him (and the other teammate) again.

Of course, I don't know how he felt internally and some of the comments in this thread made me reconsider how happy he was - he seemed happy at work, but idk.

In terms of type, I usually hear what OP said, that this industry is best for NTs, but I think there are distinct advantages to being a Sensing type too. I think Sensors and Intuitives often approach the same problem differently but ultimately arrive at similar solutions in a similar amount of time. So I think from an employer's perspective, S/N is pretty much irrelevant.

The Intuitive's advantage is in relatively novel situations because of the ability to find novel solutions easily. An earlier comment mentioned being given a firm structure, and I think this applies to some areas within the field. I'm in data science and at least for my particular role, I create the structure the vast majority of the time, it's rarely given to me. At most, management tells me how the end result needs to function and I need to figure out the components that are involved and how to get there. I thrive in this kind of setting, but it's not for everyone.

I can't speak for a Sensing type's process, but I think a Sensing type might rely more on past experience to find a solution while I tend to easily forget past experiences even when the solution was very strong. And they might remember more specifics of solutions wrt what worked or didn't work. So there are big advantages to that approach too.

With T/F, the F types I've worked with can generally handle the logic just fine. I think some become drained more quickly or don't want to focus only on logic for as long while it'd come more naturally to a T type. And it has been mentioned in this thread that the caring/helping side of the personality can't be exercised on the job.
 

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I think ISFJ would be good for software developer and best for code-tester. Their penchant for thoroughness, detail and neatness is remarkable.
 
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