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Discussion Starter #1
Apparently im an aspie. Found multiple reports from my school to my parents on my behavior. Not angry or sad in the least but i feel so misunderstood. Like many of the things they listed there make it all sound like i do it all for no reason but everything i do i only do on reason.

So now im wondering what negative or notable things do you see aspies do? Because if i manage to find the faults with myself i am hoping i can fix or work my way around them. Even if its negative or positive im gonna keep an open mind on every possibility.
 

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Don't have a strong opinion of them... to give a definitive answer would be to generalize. But I have noticed that aspergers seems to be correlated to the INTJ personality type. Here is a girl who talks about it... you might find this interesting. Maybe. Haha.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is aspergers really a illness? Because to me it seems like someone that doesn't want to be like the majority of society and for that they slap a medical sticker on it.
 

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Is aspergers really a illness? Because to me it seems like someone that doesn't want to be like the majority of society and for that they slap a medical sticker on it.
Its tricky. Some types of empathy are thought to be biologically hardwired. e.g. recognizing facial expression and their emotions, picking up on body language, mimic effects. Aspergers may just be a lack of some of these a priori qualities.
 

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I don't think negative thoughts about people with Aspbergers. However, I can try to answer your question in regard to notable things they do.

They can be very literal and serious, missing jokes or sarcasm, which can seem odd to some people. Sometimes they miss other social cues. Here's an example of an awkward encounter my Sister experienced:

She was attending a church and there was a guy with Aspbergers who also went to the church; he talked to her a lot, and she was always very friendly with him and welcoming of him to sit by her (she's an ENFJ). She said he would do some strange things, but it was nothing that could prevent her from being his friend.

One day, as they were doing the offering, she went to reach in her purse to get money and he told her he would contribute on her behalf. She told him thank you, but she was able to donate money herself, and she was just trying to find the $5 bill she had in her purse. He insisted, and she insisted that he not. Finally, she said he got really mad and said "will you just take the money?!" and yelled at her very sharply. From there on out, she didn't want to be his friend anymore and she avoided him.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I wouldnt do anything like that. Aspergers or not i do have an understanding of right and wrong, what to do when are where, what emotions people display at certain events and i respect peoples privacy. Although i know i dont display many social rituals like keeping eye contact with those who are talking to you but that is all by choice. I show eye contact to those who i believe are worthy of spending my time with. (Couldnt think of other word then worthy. Not trying to sound full up and such..) but thank you for that example.
 

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Is aspergers really a illness? Because to me it seems like someone that doesn't want to be like the majority of society and for that they slap a medical sticker on it.
Most people eat themselves to death. If it was a small minority it would be considered a mental illness or disorder.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ouch. When i saw the start of that title "Pretending to be normal".

But i was diagnosed when i was young. Through many years of medication i lost the majority of aspie traits. (Thankfully all of the ones that people will think your weird.) I am off the medication now and with effort i am normal to a degree. May be viewed as a loner but not unusual or weird. Maintain good relations with the majority of my class mates.

Also i did take a few aspie tests of recent. Each one listed me as very likely Nero-typical.
 

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I have a friend with an aspie child. He was very difficult from birth, fussy and particular. As he developed it was pretty apparent that he didn't operate the same way other kids did. Everything was literal. I remember them visiting over night when he was 6; he was instructed to take care on the trampoline and make sure to stay in the middle and not jump near the edges. It was pretty adorable seeing him bouncing like a little rain man observing exactly in the middle protocol for trampoline "fun". He then put on his shoes and socks and thoughtfully said. "My mother buys these socks. They are all the same and they never fall down. They are designed not to. It's so when I lose a sock I don't have to look for another one which is exactly the same. It's much better this way."

He was kept back a couple of years in school and sent to another which specialised in Asperger's kids. He was successfully placed back into primary school where he is now. After seeing his work (creatively) he is pretty astounding and extremely intelligent. It's little wonder that he found it so hard being around other kids.

There really aren't any opinions to be had about his "condition". He's just a brilliant but odd boy. He's lucky to have such wonderful parents. I can imagine that if he didn't that it would be a problematic and he would be upset an awful lot. It's good that he has found his place and means in which to be understood and excel at what he does.
 

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My younger brother has aspergers. He's in his early 20s now and not as bad as he used to be, but he still has his moments... I don't know if this is typical of all people with apsergers, but he pays too much attention to the news and it always upsets him. When it says on the news something like "flooding" or "drought" or w/e he'll spend all day crying about it. It's beyond me why he reads the news all the time; it never fails to make him worry about something or make him cry. He is also extremely fussy about food - he eats the same things all the time and refuses to eat biscuits that are "the wrong shape" (his own words). He also has a strict routine he has to follow and if something stops him from following his schedule in any way he goes insane (he's not as bad as he used to be and is more flexible now). He also has eidetic memory. As a child, certain sounds hurt his ears, he had extreme touch sensitivity and so he couldn't wear certain clothes because they hurt him. I remember one time, when we were kids, when we got on a bus, he went berserk because someone else was sat in "his seat" (he used to sit in the same seat everytime he got on a bus). That's what he was like :tongue:

Besides my brother, I don't know anyone else with aspergers/autism.
 

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Syndrome... Is the keyword here.

I wonder what the syndrome name is for a bunch of pseudo-intellectuals that come up with a book called 'DSM-IV'?

'First Stone Syndrome'... 'Point at everyone's flaws but mine Syndrome'... 'Opinionated Asshole sitting on a Leather Chair Syndrome'.
 

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My younger brother has aspergers. He's in his early 20s now and not as bad as he used to be, but he still has his moments... I don't know if this is typical of all people with apsergers, but he pays too much attention to the news and it always upsets him. When it says on the news something like "flooding" or "drought" or w/e he'll spend all day crying about it. It's beyond me why he reads the news all the time; it never fails to make him worry about something or make him cry. He is also extremely fussy about food - he eats the same things all the time and refuses to eat biscuits that are "the wrong shape" (his own words). He also has a strict routine he has to follow and if something stops him from following his schedule in any way he goes insane (he's not as bad as he used to be and is more flexible now). He also has eidetic memory. As a child, certain sounds hurt his ears, he had extreme touch sensitivity and so he couldn't wear certain clothes because they hurt him. I remember one time, when we were kids, when we got on a bus, he went berserk because someone else was sat in "his seat" (he used to sit in the same seat everytime he got on a bus). That's what he was like :tongue:

Besides my brother, I don't know anyone else with aspergers/autism.
My younger brother has Asperger's as well, so I can relate to a lot of this. He loves to wear clothes that are made out of microfibre or any kind of silky material... he used to love to wear my bathing suits when we were kids until ESTJ father put the kibosh on that, heaven forbid someone think his son was a "fairy." My brother also doesn't handle stress well; he basically jumps up and down and flaps his hands like a bird (although he's learned to do it in private when people are over). He has a lot of difficulty maintaining eye contact with people and he has a hard time understanding that lying usually isn't an appropriate form of social behaviour. He struggled a lot with math in school, but he was always very good at english/history.

I wasn't a very patient kid, so it took me a really long time to learn how to deal with him, but we've gotten a lot closer in the last few years and a lot of the time I act as his mediator with specific family members because I often have a weird understanding of where he's coming from.

The flip side of that is that one of my philosophy classmates suffers from severe Asperger's and she drives me insane. While my brother can be unintentionally rude, etc., I find her especially mean and abrasive and she lacks the weird kind of sweetness that my brother has. She's very intelligent, but very (unintentionally, I think) malicious. She had a pretty rough time of it growing up, though, so I try not to hold it against her, but I sincerely find her very difficult to be around.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well apparently i had a extremely long conversation with my government/school "caretaker" which is what they call her because of her line of work and i don't exhibit any external aspie traits anymore.:proud:

Only diffrence she can tell when comparing me to my other class mates is aparently i have matured quicker. While i show signs of maturity of someone at 25-28 the rest of my class is still acting like teens. Not sure if this is a good or bad thing.:frustrating:
 

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Well apparently i had a extremely long conversation with my government/school "caretaker" which is what they call her because of her line of work and i don't exhibit any external aspie traits anymore.:proud:

Only diffrence she can tell when comparing me to my other class mates is aparently i have matured quicker. While i show signs of maturity of someone at 25-28 the rest of my class is still acting like teens. Not sure if this is a good or bad thing.:frustrating:
its just what it is. relax :)

the thing about getting older is that you have a greater range of ages you can "act" that is all really :)

oh, and pretty much everyone else is a first time human as well... so making it up as they go along. realising that eases the need to "conform" to how other people think you should be IMO
 

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If you're able to make coherent posts and communicate with us on here, chances are you are probably fairly well off. I realize interacting socially in real life is different and that Asperger's doesn't just deal with interpersonal areas, but I'm not well-versed enough with the disorder to render much judgement there.

Please forgive the following sweeping generalizations: I find that most aspies I meet or observe (or people I suspect have the disorder, at least) don't even seem to have anything wrong with them. The number one thing I notice is that they seem "goofy" somehow rather than deficient.

Being the internet superstar that I am, I have had the fortune of happening upon many different people who clearly fall under the autism spectrum and it seems to manifest itself in ways like... they'll be really into some form of artistic expression, and kind of do it obsessively and sometimes repetitively. And they seem to not really care (and/or recognize) that the things they like or do are what others would generally hide or be embarrassed about (not because it's shameful exactly—more in the way like, you know how a grown man probably wouldn't admit to liking N*SYNC?). If I'm not being clear, this is a good example of what I'm talking about. And honestly, I can't really fault them for this. Is this behavior really something to look down upon?

Also, this is obvious, but it's not even a disease. From what I know the diagnosis is about falling into a number of arbitrary patterns, so having someone tell you you have Asperger's is a descriptor at best. It doesn't mean you can or can't still improve any part of yourself that you wish... nor that the rest of us don't have any of our own deficiencies. We should probably start up a new Asperger-type syndrome for attention-seeking, shallow, overbearing dipshits while we're at it.
 

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Is aspergers really a illness? Because to me it seems like someone that doesn't want to be like the majority of society and for that they slap a medical sticker on it.
No, it is not an illness per say.

Modern psychology has sort of degenerated into a system of labels for normative deviance, often with the intention of providing pills to "fix" the disease. I view the over eager labeling trend as the middle variance trying to claim a correctness, some kind of superiority based on numbers. Numbers do not make wisdom, in fact studies suggest they make the opposite. It has great academic usefulness in terms of allowing study of specific behaviours, but it is too often used to define an individual as a problem rather than question the context surrounding that person. As I see it, it isn't a disease it is just a difference in style with negative social consequences but strengths in other areas.

Are there differences between someone with Asperger's and someone who is "normal" ? most certainly but normal is of abstract reference to the mean, simply where people tend to cluster, there is nothing inherently correct about being closer to the mean. IQ tests for example represent people based on their deviance from the mean, deviance in one direction being good and the other being bad, but again it is a highly subjective criteria. Sometimes the same deviance is good or bad depending on the context you use to measure it. Much of what makes someone socially powerful in our current society can be functionally useless or counter productive outside of that context, and in a different society could be viewed as highly deviant and ineffective.

Homogeneity (clustering around the average) is as often a bad thing as a good thing. It can result in stagnation and collapse, change originates from outliers. This may be part of why mentally deviant people are often incredibly creative, in a sense they think on the edges where others stand somewhere on the hill so they have a different view of the world.

Labels like Aspergers, ADHD, and similar diagnoses have an enormous amount of overlap and it is incredibly difficult to accurately label anyone with a psychological disorder due the complexities of the variables involved. More so even because the disease itself is an entirely arbitrary creation. Only in extreme cases does anyone seem to perfectly fit a diagnosis and even then it is prone to error and misinterpretation. Fortunately there is a growing body of psychology professionals who are trying to move away from the pharmacological reliance of current medicine, and back onto understanding what causes deviance and how to actively deal with the upsides and downsides of it.
 
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