San Francisco has done it again with the 'sushi croissant' — here's what it's like

San Francisco has done it again with the 'sushi croissant' — here's what it's like

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This is a discussion on San Francisco has done it again with the 'sushi croissant' — here's what it's like within the Trends Forum forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; ...

  1. #1

    San Francisco has done it again with the 'sushi croissant' — here's what it's like





    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    First, the "sushi burrito" took over San Francisco.

    Now, a flaky pastry stuffed with smoked salmon, seaweed, ginger, and wasabi — a "sushi croissant" — is capturing the hearts of those brave enough to try it.
    The sushi-stuffed pastry comes from the creative minds of Mr. Holmes Bakehouse, a bakery in San Francisco's Tenderloin district that's famous for its hybrid desserts and drool-worthy Instagram feed. The bakery calls the pastry a "California croissant," in honor of its sister, the California roll.

    We visited the kitchen of Mr. Holmes Bakehouse to see how it comes together.

    Brittany Dunn, a pastry chef at Mr. Holmes Bakehouse, says it took her a week to try the bakery's "California croissant" after she was hired. "That sounds awful," she remembers thinking.
    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    It turned out to be love at first bite. The California croissant has since become Dunn's favorite item on the menu at Bakehouse, which is known for its popular "cruffin" (a croissant-muffin hybrid).


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Before we gave the California croissant a taste, Dunn led us into the kitchen to see how the pastry is made. The chef piped a stripe of wasabi along the pastry's edge.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    "It looks like a lot," Dunn said. But the heat of the wasabi burns off in the oven.

    The dough is made by hand over the course of three days. "It takes a lot of butter — very, very good butter," Dunn said, laying down a sheet of seaweed.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Next, Dunn piled on pickled ginger and Norwegian smoked salmon. "We don't like to skimp around here — get as much guilty pleasure as you can shove in there," she said.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Then we were ready to roll. Dunn picked up the widest part of the pastry and folded it over itself, careful to keep the pointed end centered so the croissant would bake evenly.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    The croissants get a sprinkling of salt, sesame seeds, and crumbled seaweed. They bake for about 20 minutes until they turn "poofy" and golden brown.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Voilà! Now, for the taste test ...


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    I went in from the side on my first bite. The pastry crunched on the outside, and flaked into soft and airy pieces on the inside. I lost myself in the croissant's golden ridges.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    The smoked salmon and seaweed exploded with salty, savory flavor. I managed to fit a bit of sushi into every nibble. But I wouldn't say it tasted like sushi. ...


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    The California croissant was more reminiscent of a bagel with lox than a sushi roll. It was the first time I had ever thought to myself, "Hmm, I wish this tasted fishier."


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Still, I devoured it. If bagels and lox are your jam, you will love Mr. Holmes Bakehouse's crazy Frankenpastry. The San Francisco location sells up to 100 on a given weekend day.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    The California croissant sells for about $5.
    He's a Superhero! and Chesire Tower thanked this post.



  2. #2

    I tried the sushi burrito, the 'mutant food' San Franciscans are obsessed with




    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    "Mutant foods" from the cronut to the ramen burger come and go, disappearing from social media as quickly as they blow up. But San Francisco's passion for the sushi burrito refuses to die.

    When we first laid eyes on the mythical "sushirrito" on Reddit in 2013, it seemed too good to be true: a sushi roll swollen to the size of a burrito, stuffed with veggies, sauces, rice, and raw fish, and eaten with your hands. Fast-forward four years, and people are still forming lines outside Sushirrito, a Bay Area restaurant chain that claims to be the birthplace of this beastly food.

    I stopped by Sushirrito's location in SoMa to see if the sushi burrito meets the hype.

    Sushirrito founder Peter Yen created the sushi burrito based on a craving.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Today, the restaurant chain has six locations in the Bay Area and one in New York's Flatiron neighborhood. There's usually a line out the door.
    @mattyglesias The line outside Sushirrito in Palo Alto. Just sayin’ pic.twitter.com/vXk8q3yB5H
    — Andrew Sterian (@steriana) October 19, 2016

    Ropes barricade the door, as if hungry patrons are clamoring to get into a club.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Inside, diners queue up in front of the food prep area. You can't customize what goes inside your burrito, unlike other quick-service chains like Chipotle or Subway.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    The menu consists of eight varieties, ranging from $9 to $13.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    It's mesmerizing to watch the sushi burrito come together in just seconds. Like a normal sushi roll, a plastic-bamboo mat is used to tuck the ingredients into a pinwheel.



    I ordered three burritos. They came nestled in these neat take-out boxes.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    I unwrapped the Geisha's Kiss burrito to find it really did look like a jumbo-sized sushi roll. It combines Japanese and Latin flavors, with yellowfin tuna, fish roe, chips made from lotus root, egg, piquillo peppers, cucumber, lettuce, and a ginger-infused guacamole.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Seaweed paper and white rice held together the tightly packed ingredients.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    I sunk my teeth into glistening chunks of yellowfin tuna. Fresh and firm, the fish tasted like it could have been line-caught that morning. The lotus chips added a nice crunch.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Next I tried the Salmon Samba, which contains oven-baked salmon, tempura-fried asparagus, cucumber, lettuce, ginger-infused guacamole, pepitas, and wasabi dust.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    My first bites into the Salmon Samba distinctly reminded me of eating a salmon burger. The cooked salmon combined with the pepitas created a nutty, caramelized flavor.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    My favorite part was the tangy, pickled cucumbers. But the Salmon Samba paled in comparison to the Geisha's Kiss, in part because it didn't taste like traditional sushi.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Lastly, I dug into the Sumo Crunch, a combination of shrimp tempura, surimi crab, shaved cabbage, cucumber, ginger-infused guacamole, and Sriracha aioli.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Red tempura flakes coat the outside of the burrito, giving each bite a spicy kick.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    This burrito screamed "California roll." I thought the mounds of crab would overpower the other ingredients, but the heat from Sriracha aioli kept it from being boring.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider

    Each sushi burrito packed a generous amount of fish, which was good and bad. They tasted delicious (at a reasonable price), but several hours later, I still felt sickly stuffed.


    Melia Robinson/Business Insider
    FYI: I ate a few bites of each burrito, not three entire burritos.

    Was it better than regular sushi? I don't think so. With a burrito, you lose out on the chance to try a few different rolls with your friends. But will I be back? 100%.


    Melia Robinson/BI

  3. #3

    Those look pretty good actually. Would try some if I ever go to Frisco!

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  5. #4

    These are the type of restaurants that I go to that make me excited before I walk in, and then I look at the price then proceed to walk out.


    #FoodStartups
    PowerShell thanked this post.

  6. #5

    So in another year, this will be at Whole Foods in Austin. I just saw they got sushi burritos. That looks good though.

  7. #6

     

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