GUIDE: Narrowing down your Enneagram type using triads

GUIDE: Narrowing down your Enneagram type using triads

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This is a discussion on GUIDE: Narrowing down your Enneagram type using triads within the What's my Enneagram type? forums, part of the Enneagram Personality Theory Forum category; Narrowing Down Your Enneagram Type Using Triads Most users determine their enneagram type by reading descriptions or taking quizzes, but ...

  1. #1

    GUIDE: Narrowing down your Enneagram type using triads

    Narrowing Down Your Enneagram Type Using Triads

    Most users determine their enneagram type by reading descriptions or taking quizzes, but there's a quick & dirty method to narrowing down your type using triads and coping mechanisms. It's an easy three step process.

    Step 1: Hornevian Triads

    The "hornevian triads" are another way to group types in the Enneagram. Read the following three descriptions and see which one best matches you. It's likely they all apply to you to some degree; the question is which is the most true.

    Are you withdrawn? (When problems arise, do you tend to withdraw into your own head, using logic or emotions?) Then you may want to consider 4, 5, and 9.

    Are you always checked by your superego? (When problems arise, do you feel like your conscience/sense of right and wrong demands you act a certain way?) Then you may want to consider 1, 2 or 6.

    Are you assertive? (When problems arise, do you address them assertively to get what you want?) Then you may want to consider 7, 8, or 3.

    Step 2: Harmonic Triads

    Like the Hornevian triads, harmonic triads are yet another way to group types in the Enneagram. Again, read the three descriptions and pick whichever is the most true.

    Are you reactive? (You get very volatile and reactive under stress?) Then you should consider 4, 6 and 8.

    Are you optimistic? (You try to see the silver lining of a situation under stress and keep an optimistic outlook.) Then you should consider 2, 7 and 9.

    Do you rely on your competence? (Do you feel that you always need to be competent to address life situations?) If so, then consider 1, 5, and 3.

    Step 3: Figure out your coping mechanism

    After steps 1 and 2, you may have a few enneagram types that you're considering. To determine which one is most likely correct, read through this list and decide which coping mechanism is the most accurate for you. So for example, if you're trying to decide between 4, 6, and 7, read the coping mechanisms for 4, 6, and 7 and compare.

    Type 1: You can become rigid and perfectionist in the face of a fatal flaw.
    Type 2: You can become clingy and over-invested in people.
    Type 3: You can become obsessed with ascending the social ladder or attaining success.
    Type 4: You can become fixated on the need to express your individuality and set yourself apart from others.
    Type 5: You are fixated on meticulous planning/observation/thinking before you act, but when you do act, you act assertively.
    Type 6: You are fixated on what could go wrong (possible situations) and try to troubleshoot them.
    Type 7: You are somewhat scattered and can fixate on all sorts of things other than your current troubles.
    Type 8: You have a compulsive need to control situations that you're in.
    Type 9: When serious problems arise, you tend to withdraw into your head to find inner peace. Conflict wears on you.

    This should lead you to maybe one or two types that you think might be yours.
    Sonny, sodden, Inveniet and 227 others thanked this post.



  2. #2

    Sticky! Thanks for sharing @timeless

  3. #3

    Great thread!

    I really like this link, it expands on the triads and how they deal with conflict, etc..
    Inveniet, timeless, Sina and 46 others thanked this post.

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  5. #4

    Quote Originally Posted by mushr00m View Post
    Sticky! Thanks for sharing @timeless
    Quote Originally Posted by kaleidoscope View Post
    Great thread!

    I really like this link, it expands on the triads and how they deal with conflict, etc..
    Thanks!

    Stickied.
    Eerie, mushr00m, kaleidoscope and 1 others thanked this post.

  6. #5

    @timeless - Do you think you should add the Triads Head/Heart/Gut for completeness?
    timeless, madhatter, Out0fAmmo and 1 others thanked this post.

  7. #6

    Quote Originally Posted by timeless View Post
    Type 8: You have a compulsive need to control situations that you're in.
    Type 9: When serious problems arise, you tend to withdraw into your head to find inner peace. Conflict wears on you.

    To me, 8 sounds like 1, 9 sounds like 5. yes/no/maybe ?
    timeless, MBTI Enthusiast and castigat thanked this post.

  8. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by MBTI Enthusiast View Post
    @timeless - Do you think you should add the Triads Head/Heart/Gut for completeness?
    I considered that, but I eventually decided against it because I wanted this to be an alternate yet fresh way to look for an enneagram type. Most people already consider the head/heart/gut triads in self-typing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jiktin View Post
    To me, 8 sounds like 1, 9 sounds like 5. yes/no/maybe ?
    Eights have a more pervasive need to control aspects of their life while it's more situational for Ones. As for Nine and Five, both are withdrawn types but they handle it different ways. For Five, the trigger for withdrawal is the lack of knowledge or preparedness. Since Five is a head type, they grapple with the fear of uncertainty. So when something is uncertain, they go back into their heads to work it out. Nines on the other hand are gut types and deal with anger; in this case, if they're put in a situation that amps up their aggressive impulses, they're more likely to go inside to seek inner peace than go out and fight.

    One contrast between Nine and Five is that nines are much less friendly to direct conflict. Fives, when they're well-prepared and knowledgeable, enter the growth state of eight and can become very aggressive, assertive and direct.
    Mizmar, madhatter, Sina and 10 others thanked this post.

  9. #8

    photo (1).jpg

    photo.jpg

    Sorry if this isn't very clear I just thought it would be a nice complement to this thread.
    beachpeach, madhatter, Sina and 28 others thanked this post.

  10. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by kaleidoscope View Post
    photo (1).jpg

    photo.jpg

    Sorry if this isn't very clear I just thought it would be a nice complement to this thread.
    That's some pretty nifty info. Which book is that?
    kaleidoscope and castigat thanked this post.

  11. #10

    @Kito

    The Wisdom of the Enneagram ^^
    Kito thanked this post.


     
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